Rhode Island Genealogy » Biographies » Biography of Henry A. Evers

Biography of Henry A. Evers

In the field of steel-letter stamp manufacturing, one of the largest makers in the whole United States is Henry A. Evers, widely known through the Rhode Island and New England vicinity for his work in this connection, having his headquarters in Providence, Rhode Island, where he has been engaged in business under the name of the Henry A. Evers Company for many years.

He was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, on November 19, 1878, son of William H. and Minnie (Lieberum) Evers. His father, a native of Germany, came to the United States early in life, here became engaged in the butcher business and remained in it until his death, and was a veteran of the Civil War. The mother, born in Germany, is also deceased. Henry A. Evers received his early education in the public and private schools of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and became a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. After completing his work there, he was for four years an employee of the Schwerdtle Stamp Company, of Bridgeport, Connecticut, his birthplace. Then, in 1897, he came to Providence, Rhode Island, where he became engaged for himself in the metal stamp business under the name of Jenkins and Evers. Since 1900 his organization has been known as the Henry A. Evers Company, and Mr. Evers has been its president and treasurer. The business is situated at No. 21 Eddy Street, Providence, and here does a complete line of engraving work of all descriptions, specializing in steel-letter stamps, as noted above, in which line it stands foremost in the United States. Most of the success of this company is directly the result of the labors and the constant study of Mr. Evers, who has devoted himself continuously to the task of building up this business and making it a leader of its type in Rhode Island and New England.

In addition to his work in this connection, however, Mr. Evers participates extensively in the affairs of his city and community. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, in which order he belongs to Lodge No. 38, known as Doric Lodge, in which he is Past Master; the Harmony Chapter of Royal Arch Masons; the Doric Council of Royal and Select Masters; Calvary Commandery of Knights Templar; all Scottish Rite bodies; and Palestine Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the Stamp Manufacturers’ Association, of which he is president; the Chamber of Commerce of Providence; the Shrine Club; the Republican Club of Rhode Island; and the Congregational Church. In his political views he has been aligned consistently with the Republican party, on whose ticket he was elected a member of the Cranston City Council. In that civic body he served as a member for six years, during two of which he was the council’s president. He also served for four years in the Rhode Island State Senate, representative of the Cranston community. He was appointed pilot commissioner for the State of Rhode Island in 1925, and in this capacity was still serving in 1929. A man of great versatility and industry, he is interested in other phases of the business life of his State, being a vice-president and director of the Aetna Loan and Finance Company and the Aetna Loan Company, of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. His favorite hobbies, when he has a chance to indulge in them, are fishing and big game hunting. Into all of his various activities—civic, social, business, recreational—he puts that same full measure of energy and enthusiasm that have brought him success in the steel engraving business and in every undertaking that he has attempted, with the result that he is highly esteemed in Providence and wherever he is known among his associates and his fellowmen.

Henry A. Evers married, in 1904, Mabel L. Marriott, a native of West Farms, Massachusetts. Their children are: Louise C., and Henry M.

Carroll, Charles. Rhode Island: Three Centuries of Democracy, vol 3 of 4. New York: Lewis historical Pub. Co., 1932.

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