Biography of Thomas E. Harrop

As chief of police of the town of West Warwick, Rhode Island, Thomas E. Harrop has proved himself an able and efficient public servant, and a trustworthy guardian of the public safety. He was born at West Warwick, on April 13, 1887, a son of Thomas H. and Bridget (Callahan) Harrop. His father, who was born at Warwick, Rhode Island, has been engaged in the textile industry for many years, and his mother a native of Riverpoint, Rhode Island, is now deceased.

Thomas E. Harrop was educated in the public schools of his birthplace and then attended the English High School at Providence. Following the completion of his education, he took up the blacksmith’s trade and was engaged in this occupation successfully until 1922. After the entry of the United States into the World War, he enlisted in the United States Navy on April 14, 1917, with the rank of blacksmith. He was stationed at Brest, France, for the duration of the conflict, and was discharged on March 3, 1919, with the rank of blacksmith, first class.

Returning to the pursuits of peace, Mr. Harrop took up his business again at West Warwick, and was so engaged until 1922, when he was elected chief of police of the town of West Warwick, serving in this important and essential office ever since.

Mr. Harrop is a Democrat in politics, and served for a time as a member of the police commission. He is affiliated fraternally with West Warwick Post of the American Legion, and also holds membership in the Rhode Island Police Chiefs’ Association, of which he is past president, and in the New England Police Chiefs’ Association. He is a member of J. P. Gibson Council of the Knights of Columbus, and of Providence Lodge, No. 14, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Harrop’s chief recreation is fishing. He and his wife attend St. James Roman Catholic Church at West Warwick.

In 1928, Thomas E. Harrop married Margaret Cummiskey, who was born at Warwick, Rhode Island. They maintain their home in West Warwick.

Carroll, Charles. Rhode Island: Three Centuries of Democracy, vol 3 of 4. New York: Lewis historical Pub. Co., 1932.

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